Mobilizing Knowledge In Interorganizational Alliances

Harald Fischer
University of Wisconsin

Joseph Porac
Emory University

James Wade
University of Wisconsin

Joyce Brown
Emory University

Michael DeVaughn
University of Wisconsin

Alaina Kanfer
BORN

Abstract

The study of strategic alliances has blossomed over the past several years partly because the diversity of alliance forms and motivations is an interesting problem of classification and explanation. For instance, some motives identified for joining strategic alliances include market entry, changes in market structure, resource efficiency, resource acquisition, risk reduction, and skill enhancement. While many of these known motivations for entering alliances are implicitly based on the assumption that learning and knowledge transfer occurs among alliance partners, only recently have researchers begun to focus on learning and knowledge transfer processes within the strategic alliance itself. The purpose of this chapter is to synthesize the findings of this recent work and to establish linkages to literatures that more generally examine organizational learning and knowledge transfer. We conclude by discussing potential areas of inquiry that might guide future empirical work in this area.

To appear in "Strategic Management of Intellectual Capital and Organizational Knowledge" edited by Nick Bontis & Chun Wei Choo (Oxford University Press).