Imagine a world obsessed with plumbing ...

"In this bizarre place, hundreds of magazines and books, and even a few television channels, cover the plumbing industry, celebrating the latest advances in valves, fixtures and pipes. Cocktail party conversation is dominated by the issue of whether one brand of sink drains faster than another. Plumbing equipment magnates are on the cover of business or even general interest publications, and become the world's richest citizens. Companies pay millions, billions, trillions to connect all their plumbing devices and to ensure that pipes reach every desktop, every home office, even every car. ...

We can focus on plumbing or we can think about water and its use. We can continue to try to manage information by throwing vast amounts of technology at the problem or we can address the human side of information. After all, it is humans who add the context, meaning and value that transforms data into information, and it is these same humans who are supposed to benefit from the information. ... In the end, mastering information management is an essentially human task."


Davenport, T. 2000. Putting the I in IT. In D. Marchand, & T. Davenport (Eds.), Mastering Information Management: 5-9. London, UK: Pearson Education.